What Can You Do With That Degree? — 23 December 2013
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What can you do with a Marine Biology degree?

Sure, Marine Biology sounds like a cool major, but do you know what can actually be accomplished with this degree after college? Join Pete as he reveals just what kind of careers will be waiting for you under the sea…

Water. It covers more than 70 percent of our planet. We drink it, swim in it and sail on it, but the sole purpose of all this wet stuff isn’t just for the benefit of humankind. Nope, it also happens to be home to millions of species of fish, plants and animals. But you already knew that! After all, aren’t you the one thinking about earning your degree in marine biology? Your answer may be “yes,” but do you still find yourself asking the question, “what can you do with a marine biology degree?” If so…then you clicked on the right blog post!

what-can-you-do-with-a-marine-biology-degree

A student discovering first-hand something you can do with a marine biology degree – study marine wildlife.

It’s a good idea to go over what exactly a marine biologist is before we dive head first into everything you can do with a marine biology degree. In short, a marine biologist is someone who studies, observes, protects or manages marine organisms – from fish, to kelp, to plankton. Obviously that could mean hundreds of different things, but that’s one of the great things about this field. Alright enough with the introductions, let’s get to the good stuff: what can you do with a marine biology degree?

The first big area of what you can do with marine biology degree is possibly the most essential in furthering our understanding of marine wildlife: researching. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, less than five percent of the Earth’s ocean has been explored by man. Five percent. That means the vast majority of things out there to be discovered are just waiting around for someone to come discover them. That could be you! Exploration not your cup of tea? Well, there’s still those millions of species mentioned earlier that we already know about. Why not become an expert on one of those? Maybe write a book or two about it? Whatever you end up doing in this sub-field, just remember who gave you the idea when your documentary airs on TV.

Everybody loves  aquatic adventures and TV specials, but without those little marine critters none of that can exist. That’s why this second area may be the most important: protecting. Whether it is over-hunting, a continuing loss of habitat or reductions in food supply, all marine organisms risk becoming endangered. But not all marine organisms are currently endangered. Why? Because there is an army of former marine biology majors all around the world serving to protect marine wildlife. Who are these people, you ask? They are in a number of different careers – from water quality technicians to aquarists to marine conservationists – all working together to protect the environments and creatures they love.

There you have it. Marine biology and the wonderfully-wet world of opportunities that come with a degree in it. The only thing left to decide now is which opportunity will you pursue? Will you discover new species of exotic fish? Will you dedicate your career to protecting baby sea turtles? Maybe you’ll become something not even mentioned in this post – after all, I’m just getting your feet wet here. The point is, the world needs marine biology majors…so stop asking, “what can you do with a marine biology degree,” and begin thinking, “what will I do with my  marine biology degree?”

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Pete the Panther

Chief Motivating Officer






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David Barkholz