Vasudev - Computer Science — 15 February 2013
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Facebook graph search changes the game

Facebook has stepped up their game, taking the competition straight to Google. With the launch of Facebook’s new feature called “graph search” you are allowed to search the locations, interests and photos of your friends.

The next time you’re looking for a place to hang out, instead of typing, “Which beach should I go to?” or “Where should I vacation?” into Google, you can see what your Facebook friends recommend.  Facebook graph search allows you to view where all your friends have been and what they have done. Now you can understand what your friends have experienced and make better informed decisions based on your peers’ experiences. The one drawback to this new feature is the speed of its search. It is nowhere near as fast as Google.

Google has always been my go-to search engine when it comes to finding information on places to visit. I don’t think this will be the case anymore. With Facebook’s graph search, I can see exactly where to go and what to do through my friends’ pictures and status updates. A picture is worth a thousand words. Granted, this will not provide an answer to every search query on the level Google provides. I don’t see anyone saying “Facebook it” anytime soon. However, I do believe that this new feature adds some serious fuel to the Facebook vs. Google war. Google+ is not doing so well in the social media space so they really need to step up to the plate. Facebook’s new graph search feature not only affects Google, but also other search engines like Bing or Yahoo. Facebook has made the first move. It’s your turn Google.

This new feature has really changed my view of Facebook. They have taken the initiative in fixing their poor search engine and I think that this is the first Facebook update that really provides value to its users on a level competitive to Google.

Do you think it’s the end of Google? Any ideas on what Google or other companies could to ensure Facebook will not take over?

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